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Posts for: February, 2018

By H. David Allick, DDS, PA
February 27, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: cosmetic dentistry  

Want a more beautiful smile?cosmetic dentistry

Your confidence is of the utmost importance, which is why your Rockville, MD, dentists Dr. David Allick and Dr. Ghassan Jacklis can help. Cosmetic dentistry is a great way to boost your self-esteem.

Here are some cosmetic procedures:

Crowns:

Crowns look like caps and are made of porcelain. Your Rockville dentist takes an impression of your teeth and sends them to a lab where custom crowns are made just for you. In the meantime though, you're given a temporary crown. The dental crown reinforces the tooth and allows it to withstand various degrees of pressure, meaning you can enjoy eating without the worry of ruining your tooth.

Here are some other procedures that use dental crowns:

  • Attaching bridges
  • Covering dental implants
  • Covering stained or discolored teeth

Veneers:

Think of veneers as a resurfacing process. Your doctor eliminates the flaws ruining your smile. Veneers are placed on the surface of your teeth.

Here are some examples of what veneers can cover:

  • Dents, grooves, cracks and fractures found on the surface of your teeth that may have been caused by injury, for example.
  • Slight gaps, overcrowdedness, and crooked and misshaped teeth can be fixed. These issues can simply be hereditary, but cause issues with bite and chewing function.
  • Discoloration and stains can be removed to give you a brighter smile. Discoloration could be due to age or other factors like smoking or drinking tea and coffee.

Dental implants:

Dental Implants are state-of-the-art installations that are used to fix gaps in your smile. The process of getting a dental implant is straightforward. your dentist applies local anesthesia to the problem area and removes any remnants of the old tooth, and places a titanium post in the jawbone. The titanium post is biocompatible, so your body is less likely to reject it.

Afterwards, they will surgically seal the area and give you a temporary crown. The titanium post will need to osseointegrate, which takes three to six months. This process simply means the titanium post will fuse with the bone, therefore giving your support and strength.

When the three to six months pass, you will go back to your doctor. They will re-open the area and attach an abutment and a permanent crown that matches the rest of your teeth.

If you have any questions or concerns, call your Rockville, MD, dentist.


By H. David Allick, DDS, PA
February 16, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: dental injuries  
KeepAheadofPotentialSidetrackstoYourChildsOralHealth

From birth to young adulthood, your child's teeth gums and other mouth structures steadily grow and mature. Sometimes, though, problems arise and get in the way of their oral health. It's important we detect when that happens and take action.

We can sort these potential problems into three broad categories: developmental, disease and injury. The first category includes such problems during their childhood years as teeth erupting out of position or the jaws growing improperly and becoming abnormally long, short, wide or narrow.

The possibility of developmental problems is a primary reason for regular dental visits, beginning around your child's first birthday. If we can detect a growing problem early, we may be able to minimize or even reverse its impact to your child's oral health.

Regular dental care also helps control disease, particularly tooth decay and cavity formation. Our primary aim is to treat decay, even in primary (baby) teeth: losing a primary tooth to decay could adversely affect the incoming permanent tooth's jaw position. Besides treatment, we can also help prevent decay with topical fluoride treatments (to strengthen enamel) and sealants.

Although not as common as disease, dental problems due to injury still occur all too frequently. Blows to the mouth can chip teeth, loosen them or even knock them out. For any type of visible tooth injury you should visit us or an emergency room immediately — time is of the essence especially to save a knocked out tooth. Be sure you recover and bring any knocked out teeth or chip fragments.

We can also help you on the injury prevention front as well. For example, if your child participates in contact sports or similar activities, we can fashion a custom-fitted mouth guard to protect their teeth and soft tissues.

Keeping a vigilant eye for these potential problems will help ensure your child's future oral health is the best it can be. The sooner these problems are detected, the better and less costly their outcome.

If you would like more information on caring for your child's teeth and gums, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.


By H. David Allick, DDS, PA
February 01, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: gum disease  
AssessingYourRiskforSevereGumDisease

We’re all susceptible to gum disease when we fail to practice effective daily brushing and flossing. But you may have a greater risk of gum disease (and more severe forms of it) if any of the following categories pertain to you:

Aging. Gum disease risk naturally increases with age. We can lower the risk with an effective daily hygiene regimen, along with a minimum of two office cleanings and checkups each year. Brushing and flossing removes bacterial plaque and food particles which accumulate on tooth surfaces. The longer plaque remains in contact with gum tissues, the greater the chances of infection.

Pregnancy. Although women tend to take better care of their teeth than men, they still face unique issues that increase their risk. During pregnancy, for example, certain hormone levels rise, which cause the gums to become more responsive to bacteria. Other hormonal fluctuations throughout a woman’s life, including taking certain drugs for birth control or during menopause, can cause similar situations.

Family History. You could be at higher risk if members of your immediate family have a history of gum disease. Researchers estimate that 30% of the U.S. population has a genetic predisposition to the disease; it’s also possible for family members to transfer bacteria to other family members by way of saliva contact or shared eating utensils.

Smoking. Nicotine, the active ingredient in tobacco smoke, causes changes in the blood vessels of the mouth that could inhibit the flow of antibodies (produced by the body to fight infection) in the bloodstream. As a result, smokers experience more rapid disease development and greater detachment between teeth and gums than non-smokers.

Other Inflammatory Conditions. A number of studies indicate people with other inflammatory conditions like heart disease, arthritis or diabetes have a higher risk for gum disease. Some researchers have even suggested that bacteria associated with gum disease pass into the blood stream and threaten other parts of the body — an added incentive to seek treatment and stop the disease’s advancement.

If you fall into any of these risk categories, it’s even more urgent that you practice effective daily hygiene with regular office checkups. Additionally, if you begin to notice bleeding gums, tenderness and swelling, or loose teeth, contact us as soon as possible for an evaluation.

If you would like more information on the diagnosis and treatment of gum disease, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Assessing Risk for Gum Disease.”